Mobile KidTrippft

Published on August 17th, 2013 | by Jamie84303

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Kid Tripp Review

Presentation - 92%
Gameplay - 96%
Longevity - 88%
Innovation - 85%

Summary: Hellishly challenging, heavenly addictive modern classic platformer. You may rage quit, but you'll probably go back for more!

90%

Fantastic!


User Rating: 0 (0 votes)

Thoughts:

I’m almost as enthusiastic writing this review as I was attempting to clear the game. Yet the truth is, it could have been very different.

See, Kid Tripp is very challenging and after trying and failing countless times to progress, the app would have gotten deleted due to my frustration had I not eked out successful gameplay.

Whether it was the uninterrupted speed and flow of the fun and addictive gameplay, the responsive retro control system, the beautifully layered, sharp and colourful 8 and 16-bit inspired graphics, the chirpy sound effects. the old school chip tune by Chris Kukla, or an amalgamation of all aforementioned, I remained drawn to the experience.
The fact of the matter is, for the most part I enjoy/ed playing and relish/ed the challenge! Every time I lost a life, I learnt something new and changed my approach, or sometimes even how I played. It makes you constantly think about your actions and plan ahead. Rather than blame the game, you take responsibility.

‘Maybe, I should have jumped on that bat instead of throwing a rock at it?’
‘Oh, I totally mistimed that jump!’

That’s the point, has indie developer Michael Burns made a perfect platformer? Level design is flawless, with everything perfectly placed and AI movement timed precisely. The only mistakes are made on the players’ part.
Now, don’t get me wrong, Kid Tripp can be infuriating at times. Not only does it pay homage to the NES and Sega Genesis titles that are it muses, but it makes them feel like, ‘My First Platformer.’

 

KidTripptxt

 

Sypnosis:

You play, a kid who crashes his plane into a giraffe. He falls, trips over and finds himself having to outrun a stampede of pursuing animals. All while overcoming obstacles, hazards and enemies in his path.

Moving forward it automatic. With just three controls you touch the right side of the screen to
throw a rock, hold to sprint and tap the left side to jump.

With ten lives and unlimited continues, there are four contrasting worlds, each with five exclusive levels to make your way through, twelve achievements to unlock and four leaderboards to climb.

Upon completion, aside from feeling a sense of elation, you can go back and replay levels. Improve your time, collect all the coins you may have missed and claim your gold medals. You do not appear to have lives when replaying levels. So I’m unsure as to whether, in total, they would count towards your achievements and scores on the leaderboards. Or, if you would need to start a new game? Either way, this gives the game massive replay value.
Conclusion:

Kid Tripp will appeal to platformer and speedrun fans alike. Also players of games such as ‘The Impossible Game’ and ‘Super Hexagon’ will savour the challenge. An ode to old console titles in it’s genre, yet very much it’s own addition to the App Store, with the makings of a modern classic. It has become one of my favourite iOS titles and I’m currently amid a rerun. It’s not all been fun and games. Still, word from the dev is, he is working on ideas for a sequel and I must be glutton for punishment, as that got me excited.
Tips:

Well, this is a first. I’m not sure I’ve ever shared tips in any of my reviews thus far. Nevertheless, I learnt a few things and thought they may help if you are struggling.

  • Don’t forget to sprint! After reading many reviews and comments. It’s surprising how many people fail to remember the third control and sometimes it is required that you do so.
  • Experiment. If you keep dying at the same point and become stuck, try a different method. With jumping especially, tapping the jump button will make your character perform a quick jump, while holding it will make him leap a little higher, or farther. While there may not look to be much difference. Jumps are weighty and you can definitely tell when leaping between platforms.
  • Plan ahead. Try to learn the levels, so you have an idea what is coming up. The action is fast-paced and your success depends on split-second decisions and timing.
  • Spam rocks! Sometimes all you really need to do, is ‘go HAM’.
  • Take a breather? So you move forward automatically. That being said, there are obstacles throughout that you need to scale, like steps. These can also bring you to a standstill. Granting you a chance to get your bearings before continuing. Be warned though, this is not always a good thing, as it can ruin your rhythm, in-turn preventing you from making that next leap.
  • Gain control. Essentially, you can play this game with two thumbs. On the other hand, now and again it feels awkward and you may struggled to multitask jumping, sprinting and throwing. The solution I found to this was lay your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch down on a flat surface. That way, you no longer need to hold your ‘iDevice’ freeing your hands. What I did was use my left index finger to jump, my right index finger to hold to sprint and my right middle finger to throw rocks. I found this much more comfortable at times.
  • Don’t give up! Persistence seems to pay off. Whether it’s because you get into a groove, or because the level layouts are fresh in your head. From experience, I found to have much more success when playing the game for extended periods, rather than ‘quick-plays’. I don’t mean spend hours on it. Just when you do have a go, set aside and devote a little time.

 

Links:

Website: http://ndygames.com/
twitter: https://twitter.com/KidTrippGame
iTunes preview: https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/kid-tripp/id660068947?mt=8

 

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